Category Archives: Fairy Tales

Eric the Field Mouse conti.


Eric sat up in the smother of hay and looked at the two other mice whose faces had emerged from behind a pile of damp fiber. “I told you he would wake  this day,” said the one to the right. “I cast stones and they said it would be today.”

“Oh shut up,” said the one to the left. “What do you know about stone casting.”

“Ha, more than you.”

Slowly  the both emerged from the shadows.  “You’ve been asleep a long time,” they both said almost in unison. “Mind if I touch you,” the one of the right said and extended a paw.

“Who are you and where I am I,” Eric said pulling back as he realized that both of these field mice were much larger than he, almost like rats.

“Ah, you don’t need to worry yourself about who we are but as far as where you are well, that is another matter.”

“And the time. The time and day of the year is important.”

“Fine,” Eric said angrily. “Where am I. Isn’t this Farmer Gragers’  farm?”

“Yes, but another time and day and you’ve travelled here. You would think you have come forward a hundred years but in reality you slid sideways. We tell every arrival that they have gained a hundred years. It is just easier that way.”

“Yes,  Easier.”

“How so? Well, when are able to you will see and find you are different.”

“Yes,” the one on the right said excitedly.

“Can I tell him where he is?”  The two looked at each other  and then said, “Outside, just down the road is the town of Llandia. Do you know it?”                                                                                                                                                   1/13/17 Copyright Gordon Kuhn Unedited Text.

 

ALEEN Continued


And so as evening fell fully away from the day and
Those watching went their separate way
Speaking not of evil left there cloaked in dark wings
And left behind small Aleen to sit high upon the hill
The rocky hill that overlooked the city of LLandia
Where the mission keeper sat and looked past them as they left
Brooding about the mission sent him on
And snarled at those who turned to look back at him
For what was their want? Could they have found a better one.
His dark fangs revealed his mood and waited for the taste of blood.
That would run from throats slit by fingernail and dragon tail of wingspan spread
He would wait till fully dark and then mount his quest and deliver the blows
While the silly younger ones left behind who groveled at their teachers feet
Waited for a tasty treat and yet
And yet he recalled Anlock the Strong who spoke to him so long before
Long before the mission clear was in his mind and vision spell
There he had lain away so many days and nights until it became so very clear
That death, dear death would somehow come once again near
And as told when Anloch’s face was close, so close he could hear
The breathing from the lungs deep behind the lacquered armored hide
“Kill them swifty, little one. Surprise those of your kind larger than you.
Surprise them at your strength and keep in mind,
There will come a day when you will have to kill them too.” 1/12/2017

Eric the Tiny Field Mouse contin.


Eric suddenly realized something was wrong. The hay smelled stale, rotted actually. How long had he slept, he wondered? Hours? Days? No, impossible, he had never slept for more than a few hours and if he had someone would have woken him.

He heard shuffling and mumbling coming from off to his left and then to his right. Suddenly, little brown noses poked into the cavity. Field Mice noses. Then he saw an eye blinking at him. “He’s awake!” a mouse voice said to his left.

“No.” A mouse voice said to his right.

Then the noses and the eyes suddenly broke out of the hay and there he sat being studied intently by two field mice, one from the left and one from the right.

“It’s impossible,” said the mouse to the right.

“Well, it is what it is,” said the one on the left. “I told you he was waking up.”

“Yes, you did but….”

Eric suddenly sat up. “Who are you? I don’t recognize either of you.”

“Good God, he can talk,” the mice said together. “I think we should tell the Queen,” said the one on the left. “No, I don’t think that is wise,” from the right. “She’s been bashing people on the head with her club. I don’t even want to go near her,” said the one on the left. “Besides we need more information,” they said together.

 

 

 

Eric the Wee Field Mouse Part One


Eric the wee field mouse had spent the night cuddled in a warm spot in a glorious pile of summer fresh-cut hay piled up in a luxurious stack near the old barn on the Parrish Family Alpaca Farm. He stretched and yawned and looked around where he lay at the others still asleep and wondered what wondrous adventures would lay ahead that day.

The smell of the mound sent his mind traveling back to when he was just a baby wee field mouse curled up near his mum. Oh those were great days and nights to be sure until Mr. Parrish put out a bait that wiped out half the Parrish wee mouse homestead. Surely, Eric reasoned, it must have been a mistake for the old man to have been so brutal in dispatching his kin and he argued that position before the Grand Wee Mouse council deep in the old hay stack when suddenly a pitch fork slammed through the nest and skewered two of the council members and then, just as suddenly as the instrument of their death had plunged through the nest it was pulled out with them attached to the prongs and then they were  tossed over in the pig pen where Daphne and Derril, the two pigs, were happily munching on a fresh pile of kitchen refuse just tossed in their muddy pen. “Oh, look,” said Daphne to Derril, “look at what Mr. Parrish just done. He killed two of the wee mouse council and tossed them into our muddy wallow. “Oh, it’s alright,” Derril replied with a grunt,  “just eat around them. Maybe Chuck the Hawk will see them and come and get them while they are still warm.”

Well, of course, it was a rough awakening for the youngest of the young to see such violence done when they had done nothing to old man Parrish except eat some of his summer corn and maybe a tomato or two and all that nonsense about peeing on Mrs. Parrish’s freshly laundered clothes that she had left out by the clothes line. Mouse pee isn’t all that much and besides, to Eric and the others, it seemed to brighten up the laundry a bit, or so they thought at the time for hygiene was not their thing. No definitely not their thing.  Peeing was a mouse’s right, ancient mouse Norman had said as he was tasting a bit of cheese on a piece of oddly shaped wood. He had grabbed a fresh piece and was about to pop it in his mouth when the strangest thing happened, a metal bar snapped down and severed his head from his body. Well, you can just imagine the shock that caused. But Derril the pig reminded them that Norman was ancient and was eating too much and simply had to go. “Yes,” the remaining bunch all agreed and drug Norman’s body and head off to where Chuck the Hawk might find it. Feeding Chuck was a laborious thing but necessary to protect the wee mouse like Eric from being swept up and eaten  while out for a stroll over by the pigsty.

With all that sleepily being rewound in his head, Eric the wee field mouse simply rolled over, pulled some hay up close, and fell back to sleep.  And, just before falling asleep, he decided he would have to deal with Old Man Parrish soon in retaliation over his attacks on his tribe, for surely this was war, but he wasn’t just too sure how to go about it.

A good book for you!


scan-rabbit-in-a-box-cover

This is a book of poetry, a slice of life. It is a reflection of what has been and what will come. If you know of someone who likes to read, likes or even dislikes poetry (some have read this book that do not like poetry and yet they have written me and say write more! because of the way I write) then THIS is the book for you and for your friend. $10 https://authorgordonkuhn.com/

 

TWISTED Section Four Chapter Two


CHAPTER TWO

The three dwarfs found themselves stumbling through a heavy fog on the slopes of Desperation.

“I don’t suppose it matters to any of you but,” began a voice tinged with a bit of sarcasm.

“Are you complaining about the mist again?” another spoke from somewhere in the moist film that surrounded them on the mountain trail.

“Well, yes. I can’t see a bloody thing. Can either of you?” The voice had turned angry.

“Well, get on with it, Grumpy. What exactly is the problem? You always seem to have more than one problem,” a third voice joined as its owner tramped forward stumbling over a small bush not seen by the speaker.

“Well, to begin with, my feet hurt. And, and my ankles are tired of being twisted this way and that by the unevenness of the path, not to mention the gravel that is everywhere along through here.”

“Be grateful for the gravel,” a third voice replied, coming up from behind the first two, “if you don’t hear it beneath your boots then you will know you have strayed off the trail and that, my dwarf friends, would be bad I think.”

“Well, I am tired of the whole thing and I want to sit and rest, maybe eat a cake or two. Anybody got any coffee left in their thermos? How about you Doc? Got any coffee left? And, for God’s sake, Sleepy, did you have to take a dump so close behind us with the wind at your butt?”

“When a dwarf has to shit, a dwarf has to shit,” Sleepy replied and cinched up his belt.

“Did you remember to button up your pants this time? I don’t want to walk into town with your pants unbuttoned as a greeting for all who might see you.”

“See us, not just me, you dope,” Sleepy corrected. “And, yes, I buttoned up my pants, thank you very kindly.

“Wind?” said the first.

“Yes, wind, I can feel it. Maybe it will push-off the mists. I actually think I can see the two of you now.”

“Maybe she did that.”

“Well, it would be about time she did something for us,” Dopey snarled.

“I’d be careful of what I said, Dopey, she well might be able to hear us and would retaliate by turning you into a statue.”

“Ha, I’d like to see her try!” And, with that statement, Dopey suddenly let out a very strange irk sound and froze in his tracks.

“Holy shit,” Doc said as he jumped back. “Holy shit.” He looked over at Grumpy who also was staring at their companion who had oddly gone rigid and appeared to be stuck to the ground.